Home Computer Wing

This is the Home Computer Wing where I have the computers made for home/hobby use. Even if some actually was used in workplaces at that time but the primary use was home. Primary target was games, education, programming training and technical knowledge.


Click here to visit the office computer wing!



  • Looking for help about your old computer? Read this!
  • Want to sell/donate an old computer? Read this!

Special pages:









Translations to other languages:

Atari
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Atari 600XL (USA 1983 - 1985)
Atari 600XL (USA 1983 - 1985)

The Atari range of XL machines was quite popular in the eighties. The 600 XL was the low end computer in the range with only 16 k of memory. It runs a 6502C microprocessor at 1.79 MHz NTSC or 1.773 for PAL-systems. It has operating system and BASIC in a 24 k prom. I can display 40 x 24 characters or 320 x 192 pixels of graphics with 256 colors. On top of the keyboard are a slot for game cartridges or memory expansion module. My Atari is modified for the Swedish characters.

Kindly donated by Anders Wahlbom


Atari 520ST (USA 1985)

The Atari 520 ST was one of the first home computers with built in MIDI interface as standard which made it very popular among musicians. The 520ST came with 512 KB RAM, a + version had 1 MB. A Motorola MC68000 processor runs at 8 MHz. On the back are a lot of connectors: Modem, Printer, Hard disk, Floppy disk, RF TV signal, RGB-monitor, Built in power supply and two joysticks. On the left side the midi connectors and a cartridge slot. My Atari 520ST is made in Taiwan. Serial number A16BB4009068.

Kindly donated by Ove Svensson

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Atari 520ST (USA 1985)
Commodore CBM
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Commodore 64 (1982 - 1989)

Commodore 64 (1982 - 1989)

Commodore 64 is probably the worlds most sold home computer of all times. About 30 million units was produced! For the time it was introduced it had everything a young computer enthusiast could dream of. Whopping 64 kb of memory as standard, color graphics, sprites, sound, a decent keyboard, BASIC and a reasonable price. It become a fantastic success. Its predecessor, the also successful  VIC20, suddenly feels like a toy. A color TV should be used as a monitor and there was connectors for cassette recorder, 5¼" floppy disk drive (170 kb), printer, power supply, two joysticks and a cartridge slot for games and other expansions.
See also the Commodore section in the office wing!

Kindly donated by Anders Wahlbom

Epson
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Epson HX-20 (Japan 1981)
Epson HX-20 (Japan 1981)

This might be the first laptop computer with a full size keyboard. The HX-20 has a four line 20-characters LCD display, a small cassette recorder for storage just right of the display (this is an option, as standard there was a dummy module in this space). Built-in rechargeable batteries for portable operation. Also an built in matrix printer with a very small typewriter ribbon. And of course a version of MS BASIC in ROM, 16 K RAM.

This computer kindly donated by Leif Gidlöf


Epson PX4+ (Japan 1985)

The Epson PX 4+ is a CP/M computer, successor to the HX-20, but is based on the PX-8. It has an virtual 80x25 LCD screen . The actual screen is 40x8. The display could be angled for best viewing. Incorporated to the right is also a small thermal printer. This slot could also be used for tape recorder or RAM expansion. The computer has a full size qwerty keyboard and a line of extra function keys above. An external power supply or 4 x AA-size standard cells keep the computer running. On the back are odd non standard connectors for RS232, serial printer and parallel printer. The 4+ model includes an 120 Kbyte RAM disk.

This computer kindly donated by Pär Bertilsson

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Epson PX4+ (Japan 1985)
IMS Associates, Inc.
IMSAI 8080 (USA 1975)

The IMSAI 8080 is one of the first home computers for hobby use. It was sold as a kit to build or as a ready to use unit. A similar computer, the Altair 8800, was released only months before the IMSAI. The IMSAI was however the most commercially successful of the two. The micro processor was of course an Intel 8080 running at 2 MHz, maximum 64 k memory could be used.

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IMSAI 8080 (USA 1975)

The case includes a big power supply and a "motherboard" with S-100 slots. And of course the nice front panel with the big red and blue toggle switches that gives IMSAI the typical seventies look. If you have seen the classic computer movie WarGames (1983) this computer has an important part in that movie.
Click here to go to my special IMSAI 8080 page! IMSAI in the movie WarGames

Kindly donated by Tommy Petersson

Jupiter
Jupiter ACE (UK 1983)

The Jupiter ACE was a British home computer of the 1980s, marketed by a company named Jupiter Cantab and named after the early British computer, the ACE.

The major difference from other home computers at this time, was that the Jupiter ACE's came with Forth as its default programming language. This computer did not achieve significant success, probably due to its relatively obscure language - as far as the general public was concerned.

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Jupiter ACE (UK 1983)

The Jupiter ACE somewhat resembled a ZX81 in a white case, with black rubber keys like the Spectrum. It displayed output on a television, and programs could be saved and loaded on cassette tape, as was standard at that time. The machine was based on a Zilog Z80 processor clocked at 3.25 MHz, and came with 3 KB RAM, expandable to 51 KB. While it had only one video mode, text only, which displayed 24 rows of 32 columns of characters in black and white, it was possible to display graphics, by redefining the 8×8 pixel bitmap of any of the 128 characters. Like the ZX Spectrum, the machine's audio capabilities were restricted to beeps of programmable frequency and duration, output through a small built-in speaker.

Kindly donated by Bengt Fogelberg.

Lambda
Lambda 8300 (Hong Kong 1983)

"Your COMPUTER. With sound and music. For Family, Business, Educational and Entertainment". Z80A CPU at 3.25 MHz. 2 K RAM expandable to 16 or 32 K. 24 rows by 32 characters video. 22 graphic symbols available. Reverse video characters available. Built in cassette interface. Automatic repeat on space bar, insert, delete and cursor control keys. Programmable slow mode(!) and fast mode. 8 K basic in ROM. 42 rubber keys (ZX-81 look-alike). Made in Hong Kong circa 1982. Click here for a nice pic of the original package!

Kindly donated by Niklas Wallin

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Lambda 8300 (Hong Kong 1983)
Oric
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Oric-1 (1983)
Oric-1 (1983)

With 48k RAM, 18k ROM and a 6502A processor the Oric-1 was a perfect hobby computer. A "near real" keyboard with 57 keys. It could display 8 foreground and 8 background colors at the same time, 32x24 Chars. Built in loudspeaker, storage on external cassette player.

Kindly donated by Harri Ahola

Sharp
Sharp MZ-721 (Japan 1983)

The 700 series from Sharp was equipped differently, the 721 had a cassette deck, MZ-731 had also a build in four color plotter. The 711 was the "naked" version without cassette deck and printer. It is a Z80A ( LH-0080) machine running at 4 MHz with 64 k RAM and 4 k ROM. No basic included. Text display is 40 x 24 characters 16 colors.

This computer kindly donated by Håkan Willhemsson

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Sharp MZ-721 (Japan 1983)
Sinclair
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Sinclair ZX80 (UK 1980 - 1981)

Sinclair ZX80 (UK 1980 - 1981)

The Sinclair ZX80 was a home computer brought to market in 1980 by Sinclair Research of Cambridge, England. It was notable for being the first computer available in the United Kingdom for under a hundred pounds (a price tag of £99.95, to be exact). It was available in kit form, where purchasers had to assemble and solder it together, and as a ready-built version at a slightly higher cost for those without the skill or inclination to build their own unit. The ZX80 was very popular straight away, and for some time there was a waiting list of several months for either version of the machine.

The machine was designed around a Z80 central processing unit with a clock speed of 3.25 MHz and was equipped with 1 KB of static RAM and 4 KB of read-only memory containing the Sinclair BASIC programming language, editor, and operating system. The ZX80 was replaced by the ZX81 in 1981.

Thanks to Tomas Ohlson for the donation.

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Sinclair ZX Spectrum Personal Computer (UK 1982)
Sinclair ZX Spectrum Personal Computer (UK 1982)

The Spectrum has eight colors, a built-in sound generator and loudspeaker, and the closest Sinclair Research has come to a "real" keyboard. Its specifications exceed those of the Model A BBC machine, and come close to the Model B in many areas. At just £125 for the 16K model, the Spectrum is the same price as a ZX-81 with 16K pack when first launched. With 48K the Spectrum costs £175.

Read more about my ZX Spectrum here


Sinclair QL (UK 1984 - 1986)

The QL was originally conceived in 1981 under the code-name ZX83, as a portable computer for business users, with a built-in flat-screen CRT and internal modem. As development progressed, and ZX83 became ZX84, it eventually became clear that the portability features were over-ambitious and the specification was reduced to a conventional desktop configuration.

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Sinclair QL (UK 1984 - 1986)

Based on a Motorola 68008 processor clocked at 7.5 MHz, the QL included 128 KB of RAM (officially expandable to 640 KB) and could be connected to a monitor or TV for display. Two built-in Microdrive tape-loop cartridge drives (first seen as a peripheral for the ZX Spectrum) provided mass storage, in place of the more expensive floppy disk drives found on similar systems of the era. Interfaces included an expansion slot, ROM cartridge socket, dual RS-232 ports, proprietary QLAN local area network ports, dual joystick ports and an external Microdrive bus. Two video modes were available, 256×256 pixels with 8 RGB colors and per-pixel flashing, or 512×256 pixels with four colors (black, red, green and white). Both screen modes used a 32 KB frame buffer in main memory. The hardware was capable of switching between two different areas of memory for the frame buffer, thus allowing double buffering. However, this would have used 64 KB of the standard machine's 128 KB of RAM and there is no support for this feature in the QL's original firmware. The alternative and much improved operating system Minerva does provide full support for the second frame buffer.

Kindly donated by Anders Wahlbom

Sord
Sord m5 (Japan 1982

Sord Computer Corporation in Japan produced this Z80A based computer running at 3.58 MHz in 1982. I was equipped with 4 k RAM and 8 K ROM. Supplied with the computer was game pads and a power supply. This is very much a game computer. Underneath a flip top is a socket for game modules. On back are connections for printer, video and rf display, game pads, power, cassette recorder and sound device.

This computer kindly donated by Håkan Willhemsson
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Sord m5 (Japan 1982)
Spectravideo
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Spectravideo SV-328 (USA 1983)
Spectravideo SV-328 (USA 1983)

The Spectravideo had a Z80 CPU running at 3.6 MHz, 32 K RAM and 48 K BASIC ROM. This computer uses a external PAL-RF converter to be able to use a color television for displaying 40 x 25 characters in 16 colors. A real nice qwerty-keyboard with "real" keys and a cartridge slot on top. She Swedish version had a special cartridge for the national Swedish characters. A cassette deck is used for storage like most home computers at this time.

This computer kindly donated by Lennart Jonsson

Click here for a special page about the Spectravideo

Tandy Radio Shack

Radio Shack TRS-80 Color Computer (USA 1980)

TRS-80 Computers came in many different shapes and models, this is the "Color Computer" ("Co-Co" for short) introduced in 1980 in USA. Retail price $399. It has a Motorola 6809E CPU and 4K RAM. A color television should be used as display 192 x 128 pix or 32 x 16 char for text, 4 colors. Built in BASIC in ROM. An Extended Basic version was soon released. Cassett deck for storage.

Kindly donated by Anders Gratorp

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Radio Shack TRS-80 Color Computer (USA 1980) Kindly donated by Anders Gratorp
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Telenova
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Compis (Sweden 1985 - 1988)
Compis (Sweden 1985 - 1988)

Not easy to decide if I should put the Compis in the home or office wing. This Swedish computer was developed for schools only and not homes or offices. Well, I put it in the home wing! Can you believe that Swedish authorities started a project to develop a special computer for schools? A computer with a special operating system (CP/M-86) and a odd microprocessor (Intel 80186) and special variants of the programming languages Pascal and Comal never found outside schools! What where they thinking?

This computer kindly donated by Pär Bertilsson

Click here for my special page about the odd computer "Compis" (in Swedish language only, sorry...)

Texas
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Texas Ti-99/4a (USA 1981 - 1983)
Texas Ti-99/4a (USA 1981 - 1983)

The TI99/4a, which ran on a 16 bit TMS-9900 CPU at  3.3 MHz. Memory: 16 k RAM - upgradeable to 48k 26k ROM. 48 key keyboard QWERTY style. Graphics: 40 column text mode 32 x 24 mixed text and graphics, max of 16 colors 256 x 192 bitmap mode. External PAL modulator for TV set.